Think of the first two books of the bible – Genesis and Exodus. How do we see God?

In a few words, Genesis is all about the God who initiates. Think about it: he starts the whole universe in chapter 1. He initiates all the astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology, zoology in that one chapter of Scripture. Then, he initiates life in his image—by creating humanity. And thus he initiates family, relationships, society.

In the face of the Fall into sin, he initiates a rescue plan – promised in 3:15 and begun by choosing Abraham and his seed in ch12. Indeed, by sovereignly choosing Abraham, God proves again that he is the initiating God.

From there, he chooses Isaac (not Ishmael), Jacob (not Easu). He even initiates a rescue plan for Jacob’s family in the coming famine… by having Joseph down in Egypt as Prime Minister.

Genesis is the story of Initiating God.

What about Exodus? It’s the story of God delivering his people who are groaning under the weight of slavery. He redeems them with an outstretched arm, charters them in covenant (Ex 19-24), and dwells with them in the Tabernacle. It’s the story of him forgiving them at the Golden Calf.

Exodus is the story of the Responding God. He responds in compassion to the groaning of his people. “And God heard the groaning of his people, And God remembered his Covenant, and God saw the sons of Israel, and God knew.” (Ex 2:25)

We see the responsiveness of God to the plight of his people. But we also see his responsiveness in connection to his covenant promises: he will uphold them, fulfill them, be true to them. Exodus displays his utter commitment to his purposes.

So in Exodus we discover the Responding God on two levels: to the plight of those in bondage, and to his Word given beforehand.

Genesis and Exodus. The Initiating God and the Responding God. What hope does this give us? In both books, and in both angles of God’s character, we come face to face with one fact: everything rests on him. Creation. Election. Redemption. Deliverance. Covenant. It’s all his. As the old hymn says, “His grace has planned it all, ‘tis mine but to believe, and recognize his work of love, and Christ receive.”

If this is the pattern in the first two books of Scripture, have you seen this pattern in your life? Times when God initiates new things for you, with you, through you? Times when God responds to your groaning… and (though mysterious to you at first) brings deliverance and help (just like he promised he would)? Pause to give thanks to this initiating and responding God!

Thanks be to God!